Clearing your dns cache

 

OS X keeps a local cache of resolved DNS queries for a time defined by the DNS server. Sometimes it might be necessary to reset the cache immediately and re-query a DNS server. For example, you might need to do this if you are a network or server administrator and an entry on your DNS server has recently changed.

If your Mac isn't using the latest DNS entries from your server, you can restart your Mac to update its cached information. If you need to update DNS entries on a server using OS X and you can't restart the server, use the terminal commands below for the version of OS X you're using.

OS X Yosemite

Use the following Terminal command to reset the DNS cache:

sudo discoveryutil mdnsflushcache

OS X Mavericks, Mountain Lion, and Lion

Use the following Terminal command to reset the DNS cache:

sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Mac OS X v10.6

Use the following Terminal command to reset the DNS cache:

sudo dscacheutil -flushcache

Windows XP, 2000, or Vista

    1. Open the Start menu.
    2. Go to Run.
      • If you do not see the Run command in Vista, search for "run" in the Search bar.
    3. In the Run text box, type: ipconfig /flushdns
    4. Press Enter or Return, and your cache will be flushed.

 

Additional Information

When you might want to do this

OS X keeps a local cache of resolved DNS queries for a time defined by the DNS server, but sometimes it may be necessary to reset the cache immediately and re-query a DNS server. For example, you might do this after an entry on the server is changed or a new entry is added.

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